Bibliography

Porter, Michael E. 1998. Competitive Strategy. New York: Thre Free Press.

Blurb

The Sheepdog Book is My way of collecting how to lead life and move forward with hard thinking while also learning and using knowledge for various different sources and mental models to execute. The book then isn’t so much a static entity but something that will constantly be evolving over time and essentially will become one giant guide to life.

It will not be limited in terms of size and it will likely be hundreds of pages and applying everything that I can learn into its sections. It will be more of a tome than a regular book so I am not going to limit the space that I believe that I can use on it.

The Outcome should be a strong guide to life that is ever evolving as I gain more and more information. This project should theoretically never be finished since there will not be an end in terms of how data is gathered and updated.

I am doing this book for myself. It is a way to formulate and act on what I learned and a way for me to do the things that are most important in life with minimal effort.

Press Release:

Write a couple paragraphs that could be sent to different press agencies

Sheepdog Sections

"What" includes Leadership and Culture


Project Planning for Sheepdog Book

• Build a detailed plan of attack for the book

• There needs to be a weekly release that creates a whole need for the book. 

• Needs to create a desire for the book and app.

• Need to create a release cycle.

Sheepdog section on critical thinking

Make an offer instead of a request they are more likely to respond

Physics

Chaos Theory

Asymmetric Warfare

Army: Counterinsurgency Fieldguide

Thermodynamics

Psychology

Biology

Mathematical Logic

Psychology as applied to science, sports, and games

Book: art of learning

Creating Tribes

Story Telling

Acting / Improv

Tactical Information System

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0378720692900095

Writing Well

Book: Stress Proof

Learn how to read people and what they want

The Mind of War: John Boyd and American Security

Out of Crisis

Mental - Book: Machine That Changed the World

Writing Well

write well

Write a Book

toyota production systems: beyond large scale production

Thinking in Systems

Thinking Fast and Slow

The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had

the toyota way

the principles of scientific management

the priciples of product development flow

the practice of management

the innovator's solution

The Fifth Discipline

The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene

So Good they can't ignore you by Cal Newport

Poor Charlie's almanacs book

Originals

Only the Paranoid survive

Nudge

Not For Bread Alone

my years with general motors alfred sloan

Managing for Results

Learning How to Learn

lean thinging (daniel t jones)

How we learn

How to Read a Book

getting to plan b: breakting through to a better business model

Fooled By Randomness

extreme programming explained: embrace change

dealing with darwin how great companies innovate at every phase of theri evolution

Be unstoppable book

Title

Definition of Done

[ ] Sections and Subsections

[ ] Migrate all blog notes into sheepdog

[ ] Each Section for 1st draft should be six pages

[ ] Bibliography

[ ] Exact Outline of Content

- Introduction- Acton Grid

Management

Operations

Innovation / Brainstorming

  • ☐ Messy
  • ☐ Innovator’s Solution
  • ☐ the priciples of product development flow

History

  • ☐ Debt the first 5000 years
  • ☐ Capital in the 21st century
  • ☐ the principles of scientific management
  • ☐ Business Adventures
  • ☐ Soul of a New Machine

Startups

  • ☐ getting to plan b: breakting through to a better business model
  • ☐ Technology as a service

Self-Help / Goals

  • ☐ So Good they can’t ignore you by Cal Newport
  • ☐ Seeking Wisdom
  • ☐ Resiliance
  • ☐ Originals

Investing

  • ☐ Security Analysis
  • ☐ Intelligent Investor

Growth

  • ☐ dealing with darwin how great companies innovate at every phase of theri evolution
  • Mental Models: War
    • ☐ History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides

Maslov’s Hierarchy of Needs

Relationships

Networking Endless Referrals, Bob Burg, McGraw-Hill, 2006 How to Really Use LinkedIn, Jan Vermeiren, BookSurge, 2009 I’m on LinkedIn, Now What???, Jason Alba, 2009 Me 2.0, Dan Schawbel, Kaplan, 2009 No More Cold Calling, Joanne Black, Business Plus, 2007

Knowledge / Learning

Reading: Focused versus Diffuse Thinking

Only dip in to read what is of interest to you - these readings are entirely optional. Chapters 1-3 of A Mind for Numbers are especially helpful in providing helpful information and additional exercises related to the materials of Module 1.

Worthwhile Additional Popular Works

Video: Introduction to the Focused and Diffuse Modes

  • Andrews-Hanna, J.R. “The Brain’s Default Network and Its Adaptive Role in Internal Mentation.” Neuroscientist 18, no. 3 (Jun 2012): 251-70.
  • Immordino-Yang, M. H., J. A. Christodoulou, and V. Singh. “Rest Is Not Idleness: Implications of the Brain’s Default Mode for Human Development and Education.” Perspectives on Psychological Science 7, no. 4 (2012): 352-64.
  • Moussa MN, Steen MR, Laurienti PJ, Hayasaka S (2012) “Consistency of Network Modules in Resting-State fMRI Connectome Data.” PLoS ONE 7(8): e44428. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044428.
  • Raichle, Marcus E, and Abraham Z Snyder. “A Default Mode of Brain Function: A Brief History of an Evolving Idea.” NeuroImage 37, no. 4 (2007): 1083-90.

Video: Using the Focused and Diffuse Modes: (Or, a little Dalí will do ya)

  • Dali, Salvador. Fifty Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship. Dover, 1948 (reprint 1992).
  • Root-Bernstein, Robert S., and Michelle M. Root-Bernstein. Sparks of Genius. NY: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
  • Takeuchi, H., Y. Taki, H. Hashizume, Y. Sassa, T. Nagase, R. Nouchi, and R. Kawashima. “The Association between Resting Functional Connectivity and Creativity.” Cerebral Cortex 22, no. 12 (Jan 10 2012): 2921-29.

Video: What is Learning?

  • Michael D. Fox and Michael Greicius, Clinical applications of resting state functional connectivity , Front. Syst. Neurosci., 16 June 2010.
  • Fox, M. D., Corbetta, M., Snyder, A. Z., Vincent, J. L., and Raichle, M. E. (2006a). Spontaneous neuronal activity distinguishes human dorsal and ventral attention systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A.103, 10046–10051.
  • Fox M. D., Snyder A. Z., Vincent J. L., Corbetta M., Van Essen D. C., Raichle M. E. (2005). The human brain is intrinsically organized into dynamic, anticorrelated functional networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 102, 9673–967810.1073/pnas.0504136102.
  • Guang Yang et al. Sleep promotes branch-specific formation of dendritic spines after learning, Science 344, 1173 (2014).

Video: A Procrastination Preview

  • Boice, Robert. Procrastination and Blocking. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1996.
  • Lyons, I.M., and S.L. Beilock. “When Math Hurts: Math Anxiety Predicts Pain Network Activation in Anticipation of Doing Math.” PLoS ONE 7, no. 10 (2012): e48076.
  • Steel, Piers. The Procrastination Equation. NY: Random House, 2010.
  • Steel, Piers. “The Nature of Procrastination: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review of Quintessential Self-Regulatory Failure.” Psychological Bulletin 133, no. 1 (Jan 2007): 65-94.
  • Tuckman, Bruce W., and Henri C. Schouwenburg. “Behavioral Interventions for Reducing Procrastination among University Students.” In Counseling the Procrastinator in Academic Settings, edited by H.C. Schouwenburg, CH Lay, TA Pychyl and JR Ferrari Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2004.

Video: Practice Makes Permanent

  • Brown, J.S., A. Collins, and P. Duguid.“Situated Cognition and the Culture of Learning.” Educational Researcher 18, no. 1 (1989): 32-42.
  • Dunlosky, John, Katherine A Rawson, Elizabeth J Marsh, Mitchell J Nathan, and Daniel T Willingham. “Improving Students’ Learning with Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions from Cognitive and Educational Psychology.” Psychological Science in the Public Interest 14, no. 1 (2013): 4-58.
  • Ericsson, Karl Anders. Development of Professional Expertise. NY: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  • Geary, David C. The Origin of Mind. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2005.
  • Geary, David C, A Wade Boykin, Susan Embretson, Valerie Reyna, Robert Siegler, Daniel B Berch, and J Graban. “Task Group Reports of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel; Chapter 4: Report of the Task Group on Learning Processes.” In, (2008): 2008. http://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/mathpanel/report/learning-processes.pdf.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Karpicke, Jeffrey D. “Retrieval-Based Learning Active Retrieval Promotes Meaningful Learning.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 21, no. 3 (2012): 157-63.
  • Karpicke, Jeffrey D, and Phillip J Grimaldi. “Retrieval-Based Learning: A Perspective for Enhancing Meaningful Learning.” Educational Psychology Review 24, no. 3 (2012): 401-18.
  • Karpicke, Jeffrey D, and Henry L Roediger. “The Critical Importance of Retrieval for Learning.” Science 319, no. 5865 (2008): 966-68.
  • Karpicke, Jeffrey D, Andrew C Butler, and Henry L Roediger III. “Metacognitive Strategies in Student Learning: Do Students Practice Retrieval When They Study on Their Own?”. Memory 17, no. 4 (2009): 471-79.
  • Karpicke, J. D., and J. R. Blunt. “Retrieval Practice Produces More Learning Than Elaborative Studying with Concept Mapping.” Science 331, no. 6018 (Feb 11 2011): 772-5.
  • Karpicke, J.D., and J.R. Blunt. “Response to Comment on ‘Retrieval Practice Produces More Learning Than Elaborative Studying with Concept Mapping’.” Science 334, no. 6055 (2011): 453-53.
  • Kornell, Nate, Matthew Jensen Hays, and Robert A Bjork. “Unsuccessful Retrieval Attempts Enhance Subsequent Learning.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 35, no. 4 (2009): 989.
  • Kornell, N., A. D. Castel, T. S. Eich, and R. A. Bjork. “Spacing as the Friend of Both Memory and Induction in Young and Older Adults.” Psychology and Aging 25, no. 2 (Jun 2010): 498-503.
  • McDaniel, M. A., and A. A. Callender. “Cognition, Memory, and Education.” In Cognitive Psychology of Memory, Vol 2 of Learning and Memory, edited by Henry L Roediger. 819-43. Oxford, UK: Elsevier, 2008.
  • Roediger, Henry L., and Mary A. Pyc. “Inexpensive Techniques to Improve Education: Applying Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Educational Practice.” Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition 1, no. 4 (2012): 242-48.
  • Roediger, Henry L, and Andrew C Butler. “The Critical Role of Retrieval Practice in Long-Term Retention.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15, no. 1 (2011): 20-27.
  • Roediger, Henry L, and Jeffrey D Karpicke. “The Power of Testing Memory: Basic Research and Implications for Educational Practice.” Perspectives on Psychological Science 1, no. 3 (2006): 181-210.
  • Rohrer, Doug, and Harold Pashler. “Increasing Retention without Increasing Study Time.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 16, no. 4 (2007): 183-86.
  • Taylor, Kelli, and Doug Rohrer. “The Effects of Interleaved Practice.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 24, no. 6 (2010): 837-48.
  • See also extensive endnote references and discussions in Chapters 2 and 3, A Mind for Numbers, Barbara Oakley, Penguin, 2014.

Video: Introduction to Memory

  • Baddeley, A., Eysenck, M. W., & Anderson, M. C. (2009). Memory. NY: Psychology Press.
  • Carpenter, S. K., Cepeda, N. J., Rohrer, D., Kang, S. H. K., & Pashler, H. (2012). Using spacing to enhance diverse forms of learning: Review of recent research and implications for instruction. Educational Psychology Review, 24(3), 369-378. doi: 10.1007/s10648-012-9205-z
  • Cowan, N. (2001). The magical number 4 in short-term memory: A reconsideration of mental storage capacity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24(1), 87-114.
  • Dudai, Y. (2004). The neurobiology of consolidations, or, how stable is the engram? Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 51-86.
  • Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4-58.
  • Guida, A., Gobet, F., Tardieu, H., & Nicolas, S. (2012). How chunks, long-term working memory and templates offer a cognitive explanation for neuroimaging data on expertise acquisition: A two-stage framework. Brain and Cognition, 79(3), 221-244. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2012.01.010
  • Rawson, K. A., & Dunlosky, J. (2011). Optimizing schedules of retrieval practice for durable and efficient learning: How much is enough? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 140(3), 283.
  • Rohrer, Doug, Robert F. Dedrick, and Kaleena Burgess. “The Benefit of Interleaved Mathematics Practice Is Not Limited to Superficially Similar Kinds of Problems.” Psychonomic Bulletin & Review in press (2013).
  • Rohrer, D., & Pashler, H. (2010). Recent research on human learning challenges conventional instructional strategies. Educational Researcher, 39(5), 406-412.

Chunking

Video: What is a Chunk?

  • Beilock, S. (2010). Choke. NY: Free Press.
  • Ericsson, K. A. (2009). Development of Professional Expertise. NY: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gobet, F., & Clarkson, G. (2004). Chunks in expert memory: Evidence for the magical number four… or is it two? Memory, 12(6), 732-747.
  • Gobet, F., Lane, P. C. R., Croker, S., Cheng, P. C. H., Jones, G., Oliver, I., & Pine, J. M. (2001). Chunking mechanisms in human learning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 5(6), 236-243.
  • Guida, A., Gobet, F., Tardieu, H., & Nicolas, S. (2012). How chunks, long-term working memory and templates offer a cognitive explanation for neuroimaging data on expertise acquisition: A two-stage framework. Brain and Cognition, 79(3), 221-244. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2012.01.010
  • Nyhus, E., & Curran, T. (2010). Functional role of gamma and theta oscillations in episodic memory. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 34(7), 1023-1035. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2009.12.014.

Video: How to Form a Chunk - Part 1

  • Baddeley, Alan, Michael W. Eysenck, and Michael C. Anderson. . NY: Psychology Press, 2009.
  • Bransford, John D, A. L. Brown, R. R. Cocking, M Suzanne Donovan, and JW Pellegrino. “How People Learn.” Washington, DC:National Academy Press, 2000.
  • Brent, Rebecca, and Richard M. Felder. “Learning by Solving Solved Problems.” Chemical Engineering Education 46, no. 1 (2012): 29-30.
  • Cho, Soohyun, Arron W. S. Metcalfe, Christina B. Young, Srikanth Ryali, David C. Geary, and Vinod Menon. “Hippocampal-Prefrontal Engagement and Dynamic Causal Interactions in the Maturation of Children’s Fact Retrieval.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 24, no. 9 (2012): 1849-66.
  • Cooper, Graham, and John Sweller. “Effects of Schema Acquisition and Rule Automation on Mathematical Problem-Solving Transfer.” Journal of Educational Psychology 79, no. 4 (1987): 347.
  • Cree, George S, and Ken McRae. “Analyzing the Factors Underlying the Structure and Computation of the Meaning of Chipmunk, Cherry, Chisel, Cheese, and Cello (and Many Other Such Concrete Nouns).” Journal of Experimental Psychology - General 132, no. 2 (2003): 163-200.
  • Gobet, F., and N. Charness, eds. Chess and Games. edited by K. Anders Ercisson, Neil Charness, Paul Feltovich and Robert R. Hoffman, Cambridge Handbook on Expertise and Expert Performance: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  • Gobet, F., and G. Clarkson. “Chunks in Expert Memory: Evidence for the Magical Number Four… or Is It Two?”. Memory 12, no. 6 (2004): 732-47.
  • Gobet, F., P.C.R. Lane, S. Croker, P.C.H. Cheng, G. Jones, I. Oliver, and J.M. Pine. “Chunking Mechanisms in Human Learning.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5, no. 6 (2001): 236-43.
  • Gobet, Fernand. “Chunking Models of Expertise: Implications for Education.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 19, no. 2 (2005): 183-204.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Mastascusa, Edward J., William J. Snyder, and Brian S. Hoyt. Effective Instruction for Stem Disciplines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, 2011.
  • Nyhus, E., and T. Curran. “Functional Role of Gamma and Theta Oscillations in Episodic Memory.” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 34, no. 7 (Jun 2010): 1023-35.
  • Sweller, John, Paul Ayres, and Slava Kalyuga. Cognitive Load Theory. NY: Springer, 2011.

Video: How to Form a Chunk - Part 2

  • Brent, Rebecca, and Richard M. Felder. “Learning by Solving Solved Problems.” Chemical Engineering Education 46, no. 1 (2012): 29-30.
  • Cho, Soohyun, Arron W. S. Metcalfe, Christina B. Young, Srikanth Ryali, David C. Geary, and Vinod Menon. “Hippocampal-Prefrontal Engagement and Dynamic Causal Interactions in the Maturation of Children’s Fact Retrieval.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 24, no. 9 (2012): 1849-66.
  • Cooper, Graham, and John Sweller. “Effects of Schema Acquisition and Rule Automation on Mathematical Problem-Solving Transfer.” Journal of Educational Psychology 79, no. 4 (1987): 347.
  • Cree, George S, and Ken McRae. “Analyzing the Factors Underlying the Structure and Computation of the Meaning of Chipmunk, Cherry, Chisel, Cheese, and Cello (and Many Other Such Concrete Nouns).” Journal of Experimental Psychology - General 132, no. 2 (2003): 163-200.
  • Gobet, F., and N. Charness, eds. Chess and Games. edited by K. Anders Ercisson, Neil Charness, Paul Feltovich and Robert R. Hoffman, Cambridge Handbook on Expertise and Expert Performance: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  • Gobet, F., and G. Clarkson. “Chunks in Expert Memory: Evidence for the Magical Number Four… or Is It Two?”. Memory 12, no. 6 (2004): 732-47.
  • Gobet, F., P.C.R. Lane, S. Croker, P.C.H. Cheng, G. Jones, I. Oliver, and J.M. Pine. “Chunking Mechanisms in Human Learning.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5, no. 6 (2001): 236-43.
  • Gobet, Fernand. “Chunking Models of Expertise: Implications for Education.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 19, no. 2 (2005): 183-204.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Mastascusa, Edward J., William J. Snyder, and Brian S. Hoyt. Effective Instruction for Stem Disciplines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, 2011.
  • Nyhus, E., and T. Curran. “Functional Role of Gamma and Theta Oscillations in Episodic Memory.” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 34, no. 7 (Jun 2010): 1023-35.
  • Rohrer, Doug, and Harold Pashler. “Recent Research on Human Learning Challenges Conventional Instructional Strategies.” Educational Researcher 39, no. 5 (2010): 406-12.
  • Sweller, John, Paul Ayres, and Slava Kalyuga. Cognitive Load Theory. NY: Springer, 2011.

Video: Illusions of Competence, the Importance of Recall, Mini-testing, and Making Mistakes

  • Baddeley, A., Eysenck, M. W., & Anderson, M. C. (2009). Memory. NY: Psychology Press.
  • Brown, J. S., Collins, A., & Duguid, P. (1989). Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher, 18(1), 32-42.
  • Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K. A., Marsh, E. J., Nathan, M. J., & Willingham, D. T. (2013). Improving students’ learning with effective learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14(1), 4-58.
  • Dunning, D. (2011). Chapter 5: The Dunning-Kruger Effect: On Being Ignorant of One’s Own Ignorance (Vol. 44).
  • Geary, D. C., Boykin, A. W., Embretson, S., Reyna, V., Siegler, R., Berch, D. B., & Graban, J. (2008). Task Group Reports of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel; Chapter 4: Report of the Task Group on Learning Processes. 2008.
  • Guida, A., Gobet, F., Tardieu, H., & Nicolas, S. (2012). How chunks, long-term working memory and templates offer a cognitive explanation for neuroimaging data on expertise acquisition: A two-stage framework. Brain and Cognition, 79(3), 221-244. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2012.01.010
  • Karpicke, J. D. (2012). Retrieval-based learning active retrieval promotes meaningful learning. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21(3), 157-163.
  • Karpicke, J. D., & Blunt, J. R. (2011). Response to comment on ‘Retrieval practice produces more learning than elaborative studying with concept mapping’. Science, 334(6055), 453-453.
  • Karpicke, J. D., & Blunt, J. R. (2011). Retrieval practice produces more learning than elaborative studying with concept mapping. Science, 331(6018), 772-775. doi: 10.1126/science.1199327
  • Karpicke, J. D., Butler, A. C., & Roediger III, H. L. (2009). Metacognitive strategies in student learning: Do students practice retrieval when they study on their own? Memory, 17(4), 471-479.
  • Karpicke, J. D., & Grimaldi, P. J. (2012). Retrieval-based learning: A perspective for enhancing meaningful learning. Educational Psychology Review, 24(3), 401-418.
  • Keresztes, A., Kaiser, D., Kovacs, G., & Racsmany, M. (2013). Testing promotes long-term learning via stabilizing activation patterns in a large network of brain areas. Cerebral Cortex((Advance access published Jun 24)). doi: 10.1093/cercor/bht158
  • Kornell, N., Hays, M. J., & Bjork, R. A. (2009). Unsuccessful retrieval attempts enhance subsequent learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 35(4), 989.
  • Mastascusa, E. J., Snyder, W. J., & Hoyt, B. S. (2011). Effective Instruction for STEM Disciplines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.
  • McDaniel, M. A., & Callender, A. A. (2008). Cognition, memory, and education. In H. L. Roediger (Ed.), Cognitive Psychology of Memory, Vol 2 of Learning and Memory (pp. 819-843). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.
  • Morris, E. (2010, June 20). “The Anosognosic’s Dilemma: Something’s Wrong but You’ll Never Know What It Is (Part 1),” The New York Times.
  • Pennebaker, J. W., Gosling, S. D., & Ferrell, J. D. (2013). Daily online testing in large classes: Boosting college performance while reducing achievement gaps. PLoS ONE, 8(11), e79774.
  • Pyc, M. A., & Rawson, K. A. (2010). Why testing improves memory: Mediator effectiveness hypothesis. Science, 330(6002), 335-335.
  • Roediger, H. L., & Butler, A. C. (2011). The critical role of retrieval practice in long-term retention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 15(1), 20-27.
  • Roediger, H. L., & Karpicke, J. D. (2006). The power of testing memory: Basic research and implications for educational practice. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 1(3), 181-210.
  • Roediger, H. L., & Pyc, M. A. (2012). Inexpensive techniques to improve education: Applying cognitive psychology to enhance educational practice. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 1(4), 242-248. doi: 10.1016/j.jarmac.2012.09.002
  • Rohrer, D., & Pashler, H. (2010). Recent research on human learning challenges conventional instructional strategies. Educational Researcher, 39(5), 406-412.

Video: The Value of a Library of Chunks: Compaction, Transfer, Creativity, and the Law of Serendipity

  • Bransford, John D, A. L. Brown, R. R. Cocking, M Suzanne Donovan, and JW Pellegrino. “How People Learn.” Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2000.
  • Cooper, Graham, and John Sweller. “Effects of Schema Acquisition and Rule Automation on Mathematical Problem-Solving Transfer.” Journal of Educational Psychology 79, no. 4 (1987): 347.
  • Gobet, F., and N. Charness, eds. Chess and Games. edited by K. Anders Ercisson, Neil Charness, Paul Feltovich and Robert R. Hoffman, Cambridge Handbook on Expertise and Expert Performance: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  • Gobet, F., and G. Clarkson. “Chunks in Expert Memory: Evidence for the Magical Number Four… or Is It Two?”. Memory 12, no. 6 (2004): 732-47.
  • Gobet, F., P.C.R. Lane, S. Croker, P.C.H. Cheng, G. Jones, I. Oliver, and J.M. Pine. “Chunking Mechanisms in Human Learning.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5, no. 6 (2001): 236-43.
  • Gobet, Fernand. “Chunking Models of Expertise: Implications for Education.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 19, no. 2 (2005): 183-204.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Ischebeck, A., L. Zamarian, M. Schocke, and M. Delazer. “Flexible Transfer of Knowledge in Mental Arithmetic–an FMRI Study.” NeuroImage 44, no. 3 (Feb 1 2009): 1103-12.
  • Johnson, Steve. Where Good Ideas Come From. NY: Riverhead, 2010.
  • Kounios, John, and Mark Beeman. “The Aha! Moment: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Insight.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 18, no. 4 (2009): 210-16.
  • Mastascusa, Edward J., William J. Snyder, and Brian S. Hoyt. Effective Instruction for Stem Disciplines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, 2011.
  • Rocke, A.J. Image and Reality. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2010.
  • Simon, H.A. “How Big Is a Chunk?”. Science 183, no. 4124 (1974): 482-88.
  • Simon, H.A., and W.G. Chase. “Skill in Chess: Experiments with Chess-Playing Tasks and Computer Simulation of Skilled Performance Throw Light on Some Human Perceptual and Memory Processes.” American Scientist 61, no. 4 (1973): 394-403.
  • Simonton, Dean Keith. Scientific Genius. NY: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  • Solomon, Ines. “Analogical Transfer and ‘Functional Fixedness’ in the Science Classroom.” Journal of Educational Research 87, no. 6 (1994): 371-77.

Video: Overlearning, Choking, the Einstellung Effect, and Interleaving

  • Beilock, S. (2010). Choke. NY: Free Press.
  • Bilalic, M., McLeod, P., & Gobet, F. (2008). Inflexibility of experts–reality or myth? Quantifying the Einstellung effect in chess masters. Cognitive psychology, 56(2), 73-102. doi: 10.1016/j.cogpsych.2007.02.001
  • Bilalić, M., McLeod, P., & Gobet, F. (2008). Why good thoughts block better ones: The mechanism of the pernicious Einstellung (set) effect. Cognition, 108(3), 652-661. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2008.05.005
  • Carey, B. (2012). “Cognitive science meets pre-algebra.” New York Times, Sep 2.
  • Duarte, N. (2012). HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations: Harvard Business Review Press.
  • Feynman, R. (1985). “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman". NY: W. W. Norton.
  • Geary, D. C. (2011). Primal brain in the modern classroom. Scientific American Mind, 22(4), 44-49.
  • Kuhn, T. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (2nd (1970) ed.). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  • Luchins, A. S. (1942). Mechanization in problem solving: The effect of Einstellung. Psychol Monogr, 54(6), 1-95.
  • Pachman, M., Sweller, J., & Kalyuga, S. (2013). Levels of knowledge and deliberate practice. Journal of experimental psychology, 19(2), 108-119.
  • Roediger, H. L., & Pyc, M. A. (2012). Inexpensive techniques to improve education: Applying cognitive psychology to enhance educational practice. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 1(4), 242-248. doi: 10.1016/j.jarmac.2012.09.002
  • Rohrer, D., Dedrick, R., & Burgess, K. (2014). The benefit of interleaved mathematics practice is not limited to superficially similar kinds of problems. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 1-8. doi: 10.3758/s13423-014-0588-3
  • Rohrer, D., & Pashler, H. (2007). Increasing retention without increasing study time. Current directions in psychological science, 16(4), 183-186.
  • Rohrer, D., & Pashler, H. (2010). Recent research on human learning challenges conventional instructional strategies. Educational researcher, 39(5), 406-412.
  • Schoenfeld, A. H. (1992). Learning to think mathematically: Problem solving, metacognition, and sense-making in mathematics. In D. Grouws (Ed.), Handbook for Research on Mathematics Teaching and Learning. NY: MacMillan.
  • Taylor, K., & Rohrer, D. (2010). The effects of interleaved practice. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 24(6), 837-848. ## Worthwhile Additional Popular Works
  • Benedict Carey, (May 19, 2014), "Remembering, as an Extreme Sport,"The New York Times
  • Annie Murphy Paul, (April 29, 2014), “How Studying or Working Abroad Makes You Smarter,” Time. The full text of the wonderful study cited by Annie Murphy Paul is available online for free: Maddux, W. W., H. Adam, and A. D. Galinsky. “When in Rome … Learn Why the Romans Do What They Do: How Multicultural Learning Experiences Facilitate Creativity.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, June 2010; vol. 36, 6: pp. 731-741, May 5, 2010.
  • Lauren Davidson, “This Is the Kind of Music You Should Listen to at Work,” The Telegraph, 23 October, 2014. ## Heavier-Duty References (as mentioned in this week’s videos)

VIDEO: Tackling Procrastination—it’s easier, and more valuable, than you think

  • Ainslie, G., and N. Haslam. “Self-Control.” In Choice over Time, edited by G. Loewenstein and J. Elster NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 1992.
  • Chu, Angela, and Jin Nam Choi. “Rethinking Procrastination: Positive Effects of ‘Active’ Procrastination Behavior on Attitudes and Performance.” Journal of Social Psychology 145, no. 3 (2005): 245-64.
  • Ellenbogen, J.M., P.T. Hu, J.D. Payne, D. Titone, and M.P. Walker. “Human Relational Memory Requires Time and Sleep.” PNAS 104, no. 18 (2007): 7723-28.
  • Emmett, Rita. The Procrastinator’s Handbook. NY: Walker & Company, 2000.
  • Emsley, J. The Elements of Murder. NY: Oxford University Press, 2005.
  • Fiore, Neil A. The Now Habit. NY: Penguin, 2007.
  • Graham, Paul. “Good and Bad Procrastination.”
  • Lyons, I.M., and S.L. Beilock. “When Math Hurts: Math Anxiety Predicts Pain Network Activation in Anticipation of Doing Math.” PLoS ONE 7, no. 10 (2012): e48076.
  • Partnoy, F. Wait. NY: PublicAffairs, 2012.
  • Steel, Piers. “The Nature of Procrastination: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review of Quintessential Self-Regulatory Failure.” Psychological Bulletin 133, no. 1 (Jan 2007): 65-94.
  • ———. The Procrastination Equation. NY: Random House, 2010.
  • Tice, D.M., and R.F. Baumeister. “Longitudinal Study of Procrastination, Performance, Stress, and Health: The Costs and Benefits of Dawdling.” Psychological Science 8, no. 6 (1997): 454-58.

Video: Zombies Everywhere: Digging Deeper to Understand the Habit of Procrastination

  • McClain, Dylan Loeb. “Harnessing the Brain’s Right Hemisphere to Capture Many Kings.” New York Times, Jan 24 2011.
  • Steel, Piers. “The Nature of Procrastination: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review of Quintessential Self-Regulatory Failure.” Psychological Bulletin 133, no. 1 (Jan 2007): 65-94.
  • ———. The Procrastination Equation. NY: Random House, 2010.
  • Wan, X., H. Nakatani, K. Ueno, T. Asamizuya, K. Cheng, and K. Tanaka. “The Neural Basis of Intuitive Best Next-Move Generation in Board Game Experts.” Science 331, no. 6015 (Jan 21 2011): 341-6.

Video: Surf’s Up! Process versus Product

  • Ericsson, K Anders, Michael J Prietula, and Edward T Cokely. “The Making of an Expert.” Harvard Business Review 85, no. 7/8 (2007): 114.
  • McClain, Dylan Loeb. “Harnessing the Brain’s Right Hemisphere to Capture Many Kings.” New York Times, Jan 24 2011.
  • Steel, Piers. “The Nature of Procrastination: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review of Quintessential Self-Regulatory Failure.” Psychological Bulletin 133, no. 1 (Jan 2007): 65-94.
  • ———. The Procrastination Equation. NY: Random House, 2010.
  • Wan, X., H. Nakatani, K. Ueno, T. Asamizuya, K. Cheng, and K. Tanaka. “The Neural Basis of Intuitive Best Next-Move Generation in Board Game Experts.” Science 331, no. 6015 (Jan 21 2011): 341-6.

Video: Harnessing Your Zombies to help You

  • Boice, Robert. Procrastination and Blocking. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1996.
  • Fiore, Neil A. The Now Habit. NY: Penguin, 2007.
  • McClain, Dylan Loeb. “Harnessing the Brain’s Right Hemisphere to Capture Many Kings.” New York Times, Jan 24 2011.
  • Steel, Piers. “The Nature of Procrastination: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review of Quintessential Self-Regulatory Failure.” Psychological Bulletin 133, no. 1 (Jan 2007): 65-94.
  • ———. The Procrastination Equation. NY: Random House, 2010.
  • Wan, X., H. Nakatani, K. Ueno, T. Asamizuya, K. Cheng, and K. Tanaka. “The Neural Basis of Intuitive Best Next-Move Generation in Board Game Experts.” Science 331, no. 6015 (Jan 21 2011): 341-6.

Video: Juggling Life and Learning

  • Boice, Robert. Procrastination and Blocking. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1996.
  • Fiore, Neil A. The Now Habit. NY: Penguin, 2007.
  • McClain, Dylan Loeb. “Harnessing the Brain’s Right Hemisphere to Capture Many Kings.” New York Times, Jan 24 2011.
  • ———. So Good They Can’t Ignore You. NY: Business Plus, 2012.
  • Steel, Piers. “The Nature of Procrastination: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review of Quintessential Self-Regulatory Failure.” Psychological Bulletin 133, no. 1 (Jan 2007): 65-94.
  • ———. The Procrastination Equation. NY: Random House, 2010.
  • Wan, X., H. Nakatani, K. Ueno, T. Asamizuya, K. Cheng, and K. Tanaka. “The Neural Basis of Intuitive Best Next-Move Generation in Board Game Experts.” Science 331, no. 6015 (Jan 21 2011): 341-6.

Video: Diving Deeper into Memory

  • Baddeley, Alan, Michael W. Eysenck, and Michael C. Anderson. Memory. NY: Psychology Press, 2009.
  • Ellenbogen, J.M., P.T. Hu, J.D. Payne, D. Titone, and M.P. Walker. “Human Relational Memory Requires Time and Sleep.” PNAS104, no. 18 (2007): 7723-28.
  • Ericsson, K.A., and R.W. Roring. “Memory as a Fully Integrated Aspect of Skilled and Expert Performance.” Psychology of Learning and Motivation 48 (2007): 351-80.
  • Foer, J. Moonwalking with Einstein. NY: Penguin, 2011.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Leutner, D., C. Leopold, and E. Sumfleth. “Cognitive Load and Science Text Comprehension: Effects of Drawing and Mentally Imaging Text Content.” Computers in Human Behavior 25 (2009): 284-89.
  • Levin, J.R., M.E. Levin, L.D. Glasman, and M.B. Nordwall. “Mnemonic Vocabulary Instruction: Additional Effectiveness Evidence.” Contemporary Educational Psychology 17, no. 2 (1992): 156-74.
  • Logan, Jessica M., Alan D. Castel, Sara Haber, and Emily J. Viehman. “Metacognition and the Spacing Effect: The Role of Repetition, Feedback, and Instruction on Judgments of Learning for Massed and Spaced Rehearsal.” Metacognition and Learning 7, no. 3 (2012): 175-95.
  • Longcamp, Marieke, Céline Boucard, Jean-Claude Gilhodes, Jean-Luc Anton, Muriel Roth, Bruno Nazarian, and Jean-Luc Velay. “Learning through Hand- or Typewriting Influences Visual Recognition of New Graphic Shapes: Behavioral and Functional Imaging Evidence.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 20, no. 5 (2008/05/01 2008): 802-15.
  • Maguire, E.A., D.G. Gadian, I.S. Johnsrude, C.D. Good, J. Ashburner, R.S.J. Frackowiak, and C.D. Frith. “Navigation-Related Structural Change in the Hippocampi of Taxi Drivers.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97, no. 8 (2000): 4398-403.
  • Maguire, E.A., E.R. Valentine, J.M. Wilding, and N. Kapur. “Routes to Remembering: The Brains Behind Superior Memory.” Nature Neuroscience 6, no. 1 (2003): 90-95.
  • Morris, Peter E, Catherine O Fritz, Louise Jackson, Emma Nichol, and Elizabeth Roberts. “Strategies for Learning Proper Names: Expanding Retrieval Practice, Meaning and Imagery.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 19, no. 6 (2005): 779-98.
  • Moussa, MN, MR Steen, PJ Laurienti, and S Hayasaka. “Consistency of Network Modules in Resting-State Fmri Connectome Data.” PLoS ONE 7, no. 8 (2012): e44428.
  • Smoker, Timothy J, Carrie E Murphy, and Alison K Rockwell. “Comparing Memory for Handwriting Versus Typing.” Paper presented at the Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 2009.
  • Thiebaut de Schotten, M., F. Dell’Acqua, S. J. Forkel, A. Simmons, F. Vergani, D. G. Murphy, and M. Catani. “A Lateralized Brain Network for Visuospatial Attention.” Nat Neurosci 14, no. 10 (Oct 2011): 1245-6.

Video: What is Long Term Memory?

  • Han X, Chen M, Wang F, Windrem M, Wang S, Shanz S, Xu Q, Oberheim NA, Bekar L, Betstadt S, Silva AJ, Takano T, Goldman SA, Nedergaard M. “Forebrain engraftment by human glial progenitor cells enhances synaptic plasticity and learning in adult mice.” Cell Stem Cell, 2013 Mar 7;12(3):342-53.
  • Inda MC, Muravieva EV, Alberini CM. “Memory retrieval and the passage of time: from reconsolidation and strengthening to extinction.” Journal of Neuroscience 2011 Feb 2;31(5);1635-43. PMID: 21289172.
  • Lee HS, Ghettia A, Pinto-Duarte A, Wang X, Dziewczapolskia G, Galimic F, Huitron-Resendizd S, Pina-Crespoa JC, Roberts AJ, Vermac IM, Sejnowski TI, Heinemann SF. “Astrocytes contribute to gamma oscillations and recognition memory,” Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, USA, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1410893111, 2014.

Video: Creating Meaningful Groups and the Memory Palace Technique

  • Baddeley, Alan, Michael W. Eysenck, and Michael C. Anderson. Memory. NY: Psychology Press, 2009.
  • Ericsson, K.A., and R.W. Roring. “Memory as a Fully Integrated Aspect of Skilled and Expert Performance.” Psychology of Learning and Motivation 48 (2007): 351-80.
  • Foer, J. Moonwalking with Einstein. NY: Penguin, 2011.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Leutner, D., C. Leopold, and E. Sumfleth. “Cognitive Load and Science Text Comprehension: Effects of Drawing and Mentally Imaging Text Content.” Computers in Human Behavior 25 (2009): 284-89.
  • Levin, J.R., M.E. Levin, L.D. Glasman, and M.B. Nordwall. “Mnemonic Vocabulary Instruction: Additional Effectiveness Evidence.” Contemporary Educational Psychology 17, no. 2 (1992): 156-74.
  • Maguire, E.A., D.G. Gadian, I.S. Johnsrude, C.D. Good, J. Ashburner, R.S.J. Frackowiak, and C.D. Frith. “Navigation-Related Structural Change in the Hippocampi of Taxi Drivers.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97, no. 8 (2000): 4398-403.
  • Maguire, E.A., E.R. Valentine, J.M. Wilding, and N. Kapur. “Routes to Remembering: The Brains Behind Superior Memory.” Nature Neuroscience 6, no. 1 (2003): 90-95.
  • Morris, Peter E, Catherine O Fritz, Louise Jackson, Emma Nichol, and Elizabeth Roberts. “Strategies for Learning Proper Names: Expanding Retrieval Practice, Meaning and Imagery.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 19, no. 6 (2005): 779-98.

Reading: Renaissance Learning and Unlocking Your Potential

NOTE: All these readings are optional Chapters 11 - 18 of A Mind for Numbers are especially helpful in providing helpful information and additional exercises related to the materials of Module 4.

Worthwhile Additional Popular Works

Heavier-Duty References (as mentioned in this week’s videos)

Video: Introuction to Module 4

  • Fischer, K. W., & Bidell, T. R. (2006). Dynamic development of action, thought, and emotion. In W. Damon & R. M. Lerner (Eds.), Theoretical Models of Human Development. Handbook of Child Psychology. NY: Wiley.
  • Siegler, R. S. (1998). Emerging Minds: The Process of Change in Children’s Thinking. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. (See in particular Siegler’s “overlapping waves” theory.)

Video: Create a Lively Visual Metaphor or Analogy

  • Baddeley, Alan, Michael W. Eysenck, and Michael C. Anderson. Memory NY: Psychology Press, 2009.
  • Cat, Jordi. “On Understanding: Maxwell on the Methods of Illustration and Scientific Metaphor.” Studies In History and Philosophy of Science Part B <32, no. 3 (2001): 395-441.
  • Derman, Emanuel. Models. Behaving. Badly.New York, NY: Free Press, 2011.
  • Foer, J. Moonwalking with Einstein NY: Penguin, 2011.
  • Lützen, Jesper. Mechanistic Images in Geometric Form NY: Oxford University Press, 2005.
  • Maguire, E.A., D.G. Gadian, I.S. Johnsrude, C.D. Good, J. Ashburner, R.S.J. Frackowiak, and C.D. Frith. “Navigation-Related Structural Change in the Hippocampi of Taxi Drivers.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97, no. 8 (2000): 4398-403.
  • Maguire, E.A., E.R. Valentine, J.M. Wilding, and N. Kapur. “Routes to Remembering: The Brains Behind Superior Memory.” Nature Neuroscience 6, no. 1 (2003): 90-95.
  • Rocke, A.J. Image and Reality Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2010.
  • Solomon, Ines. “Analogical Transfer and ‘Functional Fixedness’ in the Science Classroom.” Journal of Educational Research 87, no. 6 (1994): 371-77.

Video: No Need for Genius Envy - The Imposter Syndrome

  • Amidzic, Ognjen, Hartmut J. Riehle, and Thomas Elbert. “Toward a Psychophysiology of Expertise.” Journal of Psychophysiology 20, no. 4 (2006): 253-58.
  • Beilock, Sian. Choke. NY: Free Press, 2010.
  • Bilalic, M., P. McLeod, and F. Gobet. “Inflexibility of Experts–Reality or Myth? Quantifying the Einstellung Effect in Chess Masters.” Cognitive Psychology 56, no. 2 (Mar 2008): 73-102.
  • Bilalić, Merim , Robert Langner, Michael Erb, and Wolfgang Grodd. “Mechanisms and Neural Basis of Object and Pattern Recognition: A Study with Chess Experts.” Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 139, no. 4 (2010): 728-42.
  • Bilalić, Merim , P. McLeod, and F. Gobet. “Why Good Thoughts Block Better Ones: The Mechanism of the Pernicious Einstellung (Set) Effect.” Cognition 108, no. 3 (Sep 2008): 652-61.
  • Bilalić, Merim, A. Kiesel, C. Pohl, M. Erb, and W. Grodd. “It Takes Two—Skilled Recognition of Objects Engages Lateral Areas in Both Hemispheres.”PLoS ONE 6, no. 1 (2011): e16202.
  • Bilalić, Merim, Peter McLeod, and Fernand Gobet. “Does Chess Need Intelligence? — a Study with Young Chess Players.” Intelligence 35, no. 5 (2007): 457-70.
  • Carson, Shelley H, Jordan B Peterson, and Daniel M Higgins. “Decreased Latent Inhibition Is Associated with Increased Creative Achievement in High-Functioning Individuals.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 85, no. 3 (2003): 499-506.
  • Chase, W.G., and H.A. Simon. “Perception in Chess.” Cognitive Psychology 4, no. 1 (1973): 55-81.
  • Ericsson, Karl Anders. Development of Professional Expertise. NY: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
  • Felder, R. “Impostors Everywhere.” Chemical Engineering Education 22, no. 4 (1988): 168-69.
  • Gobet, F., and N. Charness, eds. Chess and Games. edited by K. Anders Ercisson, Neil Charness, Paul Feltovich and Robert R. Hoffman, Cambridge Handbook on Expertise and Expert Performance: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  • Gobet, F., and G. Clarkson. “Chunks in Expert Memory: Evidence for the Magical Number Four… or Is It Two?”. Memory 12, no. 6 (2004): 732-47.
  • Gobet, F., P.C.R. Lane, S. Croker, P.C.H. Cheng, G. Jones, I. Oliver, and J.M. Pine. “Chunking Mechanisms in Human Learning.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5, no. 6 (2001): 236-43.
  • Gobet, Fernand. “Chunking Models of Expertise: Implications for Education.” Applied Cognitive Psychology 19, no. 2 (2005): 183-204.
  • Guida, A., F. Gobet, H. Tardieu, and S. Nicolas. “How Chunks, Long-Term Working Memory and Templates Offer a Cognitive Explanation for Neuroimaging Data on Expertise Acquisition: A Two-Stage Framework.” Brain and Cognition 79, no. 3 (Aug 2012): 221-44.
  • Klein, G. Sources of Power. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1999.
  • Klein, HA, and GA Klein. “Perceptual/Cognitive Analysis of Proficient Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (Cpr) Performance.” Paper presented at the Midwestern Psychological Association Conference, Detroit, MI, 1981.
  • Linhares, Alexandre, and Anna Elizabeth T. A. Freitas. “Questioning Chase and Simon’s (1973) “Perception in Chess”: The “Experience Recognition” Hypothesis." New ideas in psychology 28, no. 1 (2010): 64-78.
  • Partnoy, F. Wait. NY: PublicAffairs, 2012.
  • Simon, H.A., and W.G. Chase. “Skill in Chess: Experiments with Chess-Playing Tasks and Computer Simulation of Skilled Performance Throw Light on Some Human Perceptual and Memory Processes.” American Scientist 61, no. 4 (1973): 394-403.
  • White, H.A., and P. Shah. “Uninhibited Imaginations: Creativity in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.” Personality and Individual Differences 40, no. 6 (2006): 1121-31.
  • White, Holly A, and Priti Shah. “Creative Style and Achievement in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.” Personality and Individual Differences 50, no. 5 (2011): 673-77.

Video: Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life

  • Armstrong, J Scott. “Natural Learning in Higher Education.” In Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning, 2426-33: Springer, 2012.
  • Bengtsson, Sara L, Zoltán Nagy, Stefan Skare, Lea Forsman, Hans Forssberg, and Fredrik Ullén. “Extensive Piano Practicing Has Regionally Specific Effects on White Matter Development.” Nature Neuroscience 8, no. 9 (2005): 1148-50.
  • Colvin, Geoff. Talent Is Overrated. NY: Portfolio, 2008.
  • DeFelipe, Javier. “Brain Plasticity and Mental Processes: Cajal Again.” Nature Reviews Neuroscience 7, no. 10 (2006): 811-17.
  • ———. “Sesquicentenary of the Birthday of Santiago Ramón Y Cajal, the Father of Modern Neuroscience.” Trends in Neurosciences 25, no. 9 (2002): 481-84.
  • DeFelipe, Javier. Cajal’s Butterflies of the Soul: Science and Art NY: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • Doidge, N. The Brain That Changes Itself. NY: Penguin, 2007.
  • Fields, R Douglas. “White Matter in Learning, Cognition and Psychiatric Disorders.” Trends in Neurosciences 31, no. 7 (2008): 361-70.
  • McCord, Joan. “A Thirty-Year Follow-up of Treatment Effects.” American Psychologist 33, no. 3 (1978): 284.
  • Oakley, Barbara A. “Concepts and Implications of Altruism Bias and Pathological Altruism.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110, no. Supplement 2 (2013): 10408-15.
  • Ramón y Cajal, Santiago. Advice for a Young Investigator. Translated by Neely Swanson and Larry W. Swanson; Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1999 [1897].
  • ———. Recollections of My Life. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1937. Originally published as Recuerdos De Mi Vida in Madrid, 1901-1917, translated by Craigie, E. Horne.
  • Shannon, B. J., M. E. Raichle, A. Z. Snyder, D. A. Fair, K. L. Mills, D. Zhang, K. Bache, et al. “Premotor Functional Connectivity Predicts Impulsivity in Juvenile Offenders.” PNAS 108, no. 27 (Jul 5 2011): 11241-5.
  • Shaw, Christopher A., and Jill C. McEachern, eds. Toward a Theory of Neuroplasticity. NY: Psychology Press, 2001.
  • Sherrington, C. S. “Santiago Ramon Y Cajal 1852-1934.” Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society 1, no. 4 (1935): 424-44.
  • Spear, Linda Patia. “Adolescent Neurodevelopment.” Journal of Adolescent Health 52, no. 2 (2013): S7-S13.
  • Thomas, C., and C. I. Baker. “Teaching an Adult Brain New Tricks: A Critical Review of Evidence for Training-Dependent Structural Plasticity in Humans.” NeuroImage 73 (Jun 2013): 225-36.

Video: The Value of Teamwork - Avoiding Overconfidence

  • Bilalić, Merim, A. Kiesel, C. Pohl, M. Erb, and W. Grodd. “It Takes Two—Skilled Recognition of Objects Engages Lateral Areas in Both Hemispheres.” PLoS ONE 6, no. 1 (2011): e16202.
  • Christman, S.D., B.R. Henning, A.L. Geers, R.E. Propper, and C.L. Niebauer. “Mixed-Handed Persons Are More Easily Persuaded and Are More Gullible: Interhemispheric Interaction and Belief Updating.” Laterality 13, no. 5 (2008): 403-26.
  • Efron, Robert. The Decline and Fall of Hemispheric Specialization. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1990.
  • Ellis, Aleksander PJ, John R Hollenbeck, Daniel R Ilgen, Christopher OLH Porter, Bradley J West, and Henry Moon. “Team Learning: Collectively Connecting the Dots.” Journal of Applied Psychology 88, no. 5 (2003): 821.
  • Feynman, Richard. "Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman." NY: W. W. Norton, 1985.
  • Gazzaniga, M.S. “Forty-Five Years of Split-Brain Research and Still Going Strong.” Nature Reviews Neuroscience 6, no. 8 (2005): 653-59.
  • Houdé, Olivier. “Consciousness and Unconsciousness of Logical Reasoning Errors in the Human Brain.” Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25, no. 3 (2002): 341-41.
  • McGilchrist, Iain. The Master and His Emissary. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2010.
  • ———. “Reciprocal Organization of the Cerebral Hemispheres.” Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience 12, no. 4 (2010): 503-15.
  • Mihov, K. M., M. Denzler, and J. Forster. “Hemispheric Specialization and Creative Thinking: A Meta-Analytic Review of Lateralization of Creativity.” Brain and Cognition 72, no. 3 (Apr 2010): 442-8.
  • Nielsen, Jared A. , Brandon A. Zielinski, Michael A. Ferguson, Janet E. Lainhart, and Jeffrey S. Anderson. “An Evaluation of the Left-Brain Vs. Right-Brain Hypothesis with Resting State Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” PLOS ONE 8, no. 8 (2013).
  • Schutz, Larry E. “Broad-Perspective Perceptual Disorder of the Right Hemisphere.” Neuropsychology Review 15, no. 1 (2005/03/01 2005): 11-27.
  • University of Utah Health Care Office of Public Affairs. “Researchers Debunk Myth of ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personality Traits.” Science Daily (2013).

Video: A Test Checklist

Video: Final Helpful Hints for Tests

  • Beilock, S. (2010). Choke. NY: Free Press.
  • Jerath, R., Edry, J. W., Barnes, V. A., & Jerath, V. (2006). Physiology of long pranayamic breathing: neural respiratory elements may provide a mechanism that explains how slow deep breathing shifts the autonomic nervous system. Medical Hypotheses, 67(3), 566-571.
  • Nakano, T., Kato, M., Morito, Y., Itoi, S., & Kitazawa, S. (2012). Blink-related momentary activation of the default mode network while viewing videos. PNAS, 110(2), 702-706. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1214804110
  • Paul, G., Elam, B., & Verhulst, S. J. (2007). A longitudinal study of students’ perceptions of using deep breathing meditation to reduce testing stresses. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 19(3), 287-292. # Influence and Power / Decision Making and Strategy

Strategy

  • ☐ Charlie Munger: The Complete Investor
  • ☐ On Grand Strategy
  • ☐ 33 Strategies of War

The Discipline of Market Leaders: Choose Your Customers, Narrow Your Focus… also viewed

Behavioral Psychology & Decision Making

[ ] Judgment in Managerial Decision Making [ ] Pebbles of Perception: How a Few Good Choices make All the Difference [ ] The Wisdom of Crowds [ ] Predictably Irrational [ ] Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard [ ] Why We Buy [ ] The Art of Pricing [ ] Deep Simplicity [ ] Sources of Power [ ] The Signal and the Noise [ ] Influence: Science and Practice [ ] Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics [ ] Mindwise [ ] Decision Traps [ ] Thinking, Fast and Slow [ ] Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior [ ] Think Twice [ ] More Than You Know [ ] Mastery [ ] Nudge [ ] The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking ## #1 – The Art of Strategy: A Game Theorist’s Guide to Success in Business and Life

by Avinash K. Dixit and Barry J.J. Nalebuff This top book on strategy illustrates how you can change your life by using game theory. It is not only applicable in your life; it is equally effective for your career progression. Have a look at the reviews and best takeaways. Strategy Book Review:

  • The best part of this top strategy book is the culmination of ample examples. If you manage to read only 50 pages tops, you will get incredible value out of it. The book primarily revolves around the decision making ability which is the basis of game theory. The most conspicuous feature of this book is its elaboration of game theory in relation to strategy.
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#2 – Good Strategy Bad Strategy: The Difference and Why It Matters

by Richard Rumelt Even strategy is dichotomous. It has a good element that works and a bad element that fail to yield any measurable result. That’s why you must read this book so that you know what’s gold and what’s dross! Strategy Book Review:

  • Rumelt’s this work clearly signifies the difference between good strategy and bad strategy. He has given a framework for implementing good strategy and mentions that most companies don’t have a strategy in place; forget about the good or bad strategy. You will learn how you can create and build a company with good strategy with references like Apple, Ford, IBM and many more.
  • If you pick up this best strategy book, you would understand that the chief task of a leader is to strategize. And the way she should do it is by stripping away all the excesses like financial goals, slogans, and buzzwords, and concentrate only on how the organization will move forward.

Key takeaways from this Best Strategy Book

  • The best part is the simple three step framework of good strategy – first step is diagnosis where you would get clarity about the challenges your company is currently facing; second step is your approach to overcoming the hindrances; and finally, the last step is having a shared vision and taking action steps together to implement the same.
  • Many strategy books come down from a perspective of theoretical ideas. But this best book on strategy concentrates on practical wisdom and how you can apply the ideas directly into your business. At the same time, this book doesn’t tell you exactly what to do; you need to think through and apply the same into your business as you see fit.

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#4 – Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors

by Michael E. Porter This is the most popular top book strategy. Albeit it is very complex and hard to read, it is well worth the effort. Strategy Book Review:

  • If you are a student of business (MBA), then this top strategy book by Michael Porter is a must read. This is the first book on strategy that revolutionized the way companies looked at competition and their own core competency. If you want to start off with any book that will transmute your business from “mere existing” to “booming”, this is the book you must pick up first.
  • This top strategy book has changed the course of strategic management in the eyes of students and practitioner. This best book on business strategy consists of three parts – general analytic techniques, generic industry environments, & strategic decisions. You will also be able to read through two appendices, e.g. portfolio techniques in competitor analysis & how to conduct an industry analysis other than the main sections. That means, once you pick this book up, it’s a complete book on strategy.

Key takeaways from this Best Strategy Book

  • The best takeaway from this book is, of course, Porter’s Five Forces Model –
  • Threats of Entrants
  • Bargaining power of sellers
  • Bargaining power of buyers
  • Rivalry among competitors
  • Pressure of substitute products
  • This best book on business strategy first introduces the concept of competitive advantage and how it can help an organization succeed.
  • Even if it’s written back in 1980, it’s still relevant in present market scenario. The examples Porter has given are incredible. For example, in 1970s HP faced competition with electronic calculators; now the same competition is prevalent, only the elements of the competition have changed.

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#5 – Business Strategy: A guide to effective decision-making (Economist Books)

by Jeremy Kourdi Today what you do in your business determines what you would face in near future – success or failure. It turns out that better is your decision making, better would be your chances of success. Strategy Book Review:

  • This best book about strategy is written for beginners who would like to understand strategy at basic level. If you are a novice in business, this is the best strategy book to start off with. It discusses the fundamentals of business and covers almost all aspects that you need to know about business.
  • If you have read a lot of books on strategy, this book will stir your thinking. From aligning your vision, forecasting, resource allocation to implementation and flawless execution – you will learn all the fundamentals in this book.

Key takeaways from this Top Strategy Book

  • It simply starts with where you are, where you want to be and how to get there. This is the basic fundamental which most businesses ignore.
  • As per the author, the good strategy stands on sole ground of its effectiveness and the effectiveness of a strategy depends on the gap between implementation and the strategy. The lesser the gap, better the chances of organizational success.
  • One of the best parts of this best book about strategy is an emphasis on managers also in the organization. Usually, the strategy is believed to be leader’s task. But you will learn here, that as a manager, you are always responsible for how the strategy is being implemented.

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#6 – The Strategy Book: How to Think and Act Strategically to Deliver Outstanding Results

by Max Mckeown This best book on corporate strategy is not only useful for business owners, but people from all walks of life can read and enjoy the insights shared in this book. Strategy Book Review:

  • This best strategy book is written keeping the average reader in mind. The chapters are short and the explanations are apt. Without using any management mumbo jumbo, this book exceeds the expectation of any business owner who would like to learn the most pressing questions about their business e.g. how to go global, how to win strategy games, how to grow my business again and again and so on and so forth.
  • This is a book that you would not read once. You will keep on going back to the book for referencing and understanding the concepts once again.

Key takeaways from this Best Strategy Book

  • You can bet on this best strategy book if you are thinking of going to the next level in your business or career. This strategy book is full of useful examples and it contains the insights from many global leaders who have made big in their business and life.
  • If you know nothing about strategy, this 272 pages book will help you start off your journey in the practical approach of strategy.
  • This top strategy book has given a clear outline between managers and leaders. If as a manager you think strategically, you are already a leader. A manager can’t become a leader without strategic thinking, opined by the author. It’s true and if you don’t think you can’t make any decision making because you don’t have the position, authority or thinking muscle, it’s difficult for you to represent yourself as a leader.

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#7 – Your Strategy Needs a Strategy: How to Choose and Execute the Right Approach

by Martin Reeves, Knut Haanaes and Janmejaya Sinha If you are diving through an insane amount of complex questions and trying to find the right approach to execute your strategy, this book would help you immensely. Grab this and you will have a blueprint for your strategy-execution. Strategy Book Review:

  • If you don’t read any classic book on strategy, this best book on strategy will save you time, effort and cost. Pick this book up and you will learn everything about strategy that is prevalent in the market. Each page of this book is worth more than you pay for the entire book. According to the strategists of 21st Century, this book is un-put-down-able.
  • According to the readers, this book comes at the beginning of the topper list. If you have read Porter’s book on strategy, you will love this top strategy book. Many readers have also mentioned that this book can be a perfect start for anyone who is just beginning their journey in strategy.

Key takeaways from this Top Strategy Book

  • This book is step by step approach of the remarks offered by Management guru Peter F. Ducker – “There is nothing as useless as efficiently doing something that shouldn’t be done at all”. Most importantly this book isn’t only for marketing managers or business strategists; if you are a Human Resource professional, it would be invaluable to you in terms of insights, execution procedures and managing people.
  • In this age of faster pace and cut-throat competition, business owners need more than a toolkit. They need a hardware store from where they can pick and choose the right tools as per the situations. This book will provide almost every possible tools for strategy that any business owner can get their hands on.

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#8 – Strategy That Works: How Winning Companies Close the Strategy-to-Execution Gap

by Paul Leinwand & Cesare R. Mainardi This best book about business strategy is different in its approach and scope. This book can be called a bridge between strategy and execution. That means you will learn how to do gap analysis and act on the insights you get. Strategy Book Review:

  • The book emphasizes the need to focus on an identity which pierces the noise and can ensure growth as a result instead of doing the other way round. Once your specific identity is set up, you can then translate the same strategic approach into your day to day structure.
  • This book will help you understand “knowing-doing gap”. In strategy, the same gap translates into the gap between “strategy” and “execution”. The reason most of the organizations suffer from this gap issue is they concentrate too much on thinking and very less on execution and feedback loops. If you read the book, you would understand where the flaws are and how to fix them.

Key takeaways from this Best Strategy Book

  • There are 5 broad things you will learn from this book –
  • Creating and committing to an identity
  • Translate the same identity into a strategic approach
  • Take charge of your culture and put it to work
  • Reduce costs to strengthen your bottom-line
  • Shape your future
  • In this best strategy book, the best part is the authors talk about unconventional ways through which you can make your strategy work. You will learn why conventional strategy only increases the gap between strategy and execution.

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#9 – Strategy Maps: Converting Intangible Assets into Tangible Outcomes

by Robert S. Kaplan & David P. Norton This duo has previously introduced the revolutionary concept called “Balance Scorecard”. This is their book on “Strategy Maps” which will help businesses around the globe to find a link between intangible assets and outcomes. Strategy Book Review:

  • After reading this best book on strategy, you will learn that only 5% of the workforces understand company’s strategy, 25% managers have incentives linked to strategy, 60% don’t link their budgets to strategy and 85% of executives discuss strategy less than one hour per month. This data is staggering for an organization when they want to align their objectives and well-being with their strategy. Reading this book will help you learn how to centralize your strategy within your organization.
  • This top book on strategy is a magnification of an HBR article written by Kaplan and Norton. In that article, they have first introduced their theme of balanced scorecard. On the basis of balance scorecard, they have published three consecutive books. This book is one of them. Even though it has received criticism from some of the readers, this book looks at strategy completely from a different angle. But we recommend that you first read the book “The Balanced Scorecard: Translating Strategy into Action” before reading this book.

Key takeaways from this Top Strategy Book This top strategy book has a five step framework which is the best takeaway –

  • Take the strategy to the level of operations
  • Align the organization to the strategy
  • Help everyone to adopt to the organizational strategy
  • Strategy should be a continuous process
  • Accelerate/Mobilize change via executive leadership

This best strategy book has introduced a new concept “strategy map” which talks about a document. This document consists of primary strategic goals being pursued by the organization. This is kind of new as very rarely anyone talks about the relationship between drivers and desired outcomes before.

  1. ****The 33 Strategies of War ****by Robert Greene

Written by Robert Greene in 2006, The 33 Strategies of War is a book that widely serves a guide to the subtle social game of everyday life informed by the military principles in the war. It is based on the information of dozens of political, philosophical and religious text and thousands of years of violent conflict. It is a comprehensive piece of content that is composed with discussions and examples on offensive strategies that require you to negotiate from a position of strength and defensive strategies to help you respond to dangerous situations and avoid unwinnable wars. Greene provides you with all the psychological ammunition you require to overcome patterns of failure and forever gain the upper hand, in the book The 33 Strategies of War. What can you expect from this book Timeless lessons from historical leaders that ring true in today’s culture.

  1. ****Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It…and Why the Rest Don’t ****by Verne Harnish

Author Verne Harnish, in his book, shares practical techniques for growing business successfully and profitably. Scaling Up is a sequel to a book released 12 years ago “Mastering the Rockefeller Habits”. There are some mentions of the material from the previous book. But the reader can still understand the context of Scaling Up even without reading the previous book. Scaling Up majorly focuses on four key decisions every company needs to get right – People, Strategy, Execution, and Cash. The book consists of various new One-Page tools. It also includes the famous and recently-revised One-Page Strategic Plan, which more than 40,000 firms around the globe have used to scale their companies successfully. Scaling Up explains entrepreneur, ways to ace their businesses successfully. What can you expect from this book Lists techniques to ace in business successfully. Talks about strategic plans to scale up businesses.

  1. ****On War ****by Carl von Clausewitz

Carl von Clausewitz was a military officer who spent his entire career in the Prussian army; from the age of twelve till the very end. He fought against France in all major Prussian campaigns and in 1806, when the battle of Jena-Auerstedt happened, the Prussian army was destroyed by the Napoleon. This critical experience further served as an inspiration for Carl Von Clausewitz to write On War. It is an extraordinary piece of art that has often been called “not simply the greatest, but the only truly great book on war.” The book is a detailed analysis explaining the theories of war and how it works. On War is a piece of intelligent observations and a biting irony. It is also known for its memorable phrases; one of them being, “War is a continuation of politics by other means.” What can you expect from this book A remarkable book on embracing theory of how war works. The witticism and irony which makes the book an interesting read. 11. ****Good Strategy Bad Strategy: The Difference and Why It Matters ****by Richard Rumelt

Good Strategy Bad Strategy is a clever explanation of powerful action-oriented strategies for the real world. The writer Richard Rumelt puts light on the differences between a “good strategy” and a “bad strategy”. He states that developing and implementing a strategy is a major task of the leader, but far often than not they are seen failing at it. He shares that a good strategy is a precise and rational response to the obstacles to progress. A good strategy works by harnessing and using your power in the right directions where you can obtain great results in the challenges. The writer explains his ideologies about good and bad strategies with fascinating examples from business, military affairs and pragmatic ideas of life. Reflecting an astonishing grip on various aspects of life, Good Strategy Bad Strategy comes from writer’s decades of searching beyond the superficial to address tough questions with honesty and integrity. What can you expect from this book An incredible book that explains the differences between the good and the bad strategies. Provides a clear way to implement a powerful action-oriented strategy for the real world. 13. ****Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors ****by Michael E. Porter

****Strategy: A History ****by Lawrence Freedman

Strategy: A History by Sir Lawrence Freedman is based on the vast history of strategic thinking. Sir Lawrence Freedman is one of the world’s leading authorities on war and international politics. The primary gust of the Strategy is whether it is possible to influence and shape the environment instead of becoming the victim of the forces. The author elaborates on the inbuilt volatility of environment-subjects to change events. Freedman also talks about how the efforts of opponents provide strategy with its challenge and drama. Very rarely armies and nations move from one predictable state of affairs to another and feel their way through a series of states. Strategy: A History is a brilliant overview of the important strategic theories in history and sums up a vast expression on strategy. What can you expect from this book Leading book on war and international politics. Provides engaging insight on how strategy can pervade every aspect of our lives. 15. ****The Lords of Strategy: The Secret Intellectual History of the New Corporate World ****by Walter Kiechel

The Lords of Strategy is based widely on the business and corporate strategy. It focuses on the underlying dynamics of competition, cost, and customers. In The Lords of Strategy, the writer talks vastly about the four men who invented a corporate strategy that we learn today and lay the foundation of the modern, multibillion-dollar consulting industry. That initiative provided us with a window into how to think about the strategy that we use today. The author shares his experience with a novelistic flair. This book is a combination of inspiration and terrific experiences. The book reveals the account of how the organizations they led proved to be a game changer in the field of business and corporation and how that has changed the way we work today. What can you expect from this book An inspiring story of four men who pioneered corporate strategy as we know it. 16. ****Strategy ****by B. H. Liddell Hart

Strategy written by B.H. Liddell Hart is a classic book based on war. Basil H. Liddell is considered to be one of the renowned military thinkers of his time. He is regarded as the “Clausewitz of the 20th century.” Strategy is a masterpiece on military history and theory. It is often compared to great work of art like The Art of War by Sun Tzu and On War by Carl von Clausewitz. Liddell Hart emphasizes movement, flexibility, and surprise. He claims that in most military campaigns dislocation of the enemy’s psychological and physical balance is considered as a victory and the dislocation results because of a strategic indirect approach. Liddell Hart is an inspiration for business and political planning. What can you expect from this book An awe-inspiring book on war. Seminal work on military and theory. 17. ****The Art of Strategy: A Game Theorist’s Guide to Success in Business and Life ****by Avinash K. Dixit and Barry J. Nalebuff

Writers Avinash K. Dixit and Barry J. Nalebuff explain game theory as precise strategic thinking. They further add that it’s an art of anticipating your opponent’s next move. The writers explain in detail about game strategy in The Art of Strategy. They claim that the game theory involves simple common sense and can be easily mastered by developing an alternate way of seeing the world. Giving the examples from pop culture, TV, movies, sports, politics, history and based on a range of case studies, the authors put forward how every business has game-theory involved in it. With questions like, do the winners of reality-TV contests have instinctive game theories? Do big-time investors see things that most people miss? What do great poker players know that you don’t? The authors compel you to think in a different way. This book is a key to master the game theory that can help you become more successful in business and life. What can you expect from this book A road-map to mastering game theory. Helps you learn and answer basic questions and games of life. 18. ****Strategy Safari: A Guided Tour Through The Wilds of Strategic Management ****by Henry Mintzberg, Bruce Ahlstrand, and Joseph Lampel